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Emmanuel Lebesson equipment and playing style

Emmanuel Lebesson (born April 24, 1988) is a French table tennis player. He will compete in the men’s singles and as a member of the French team in the men’s team at the Summer Games in 2016 and 2020. He won the European Championship in men’s singles in October 2016, defeating compatriot Simon Gauzy in the final.


Tibhar sponsored player

Emmanuel Lebesson is a Tibhar sponsored player. His equipment is provided by Tibhar.

The Tibhar Family Archive – TIBHAR
The Tibhar Family Archive – TIBHAR
LEBESSON Emmanuel - Olympic Table Tennis _ France
LEBESSON Emmanuel – Olympic Table Tennis _ France


Number 2 in France

Emmanuel Lebesson is ranked number 40 on the World ranking. He is the number 2 player in France, just after Simon Gauzy. Simon Gauzy is considered the best French table tennis player at this moment.

Team France with Lebesson
Team France with Lebesson
team France at Europe Championship
team France at Europe Championship
Mixed doube team of Lebesson
Mixed doube team of Lebesson
Lebesson with Simon Gauzy - n1 and n2 of France
Lebesson with Simon Gauzy – n1 and n2 of France

Height: 180 cm
Weight: 70 kg
Playing TT since 1995
Professional since: 2006
Playing Hand: left
Grip:shakehand
Style of Playing: offensive
Training Frequency: 33 hours a week
Successes:• Champion of France in 2009
• 3rd place at the Team European Championships in Gdansk (Poland) in 2011
• 2nd place at the Team European Games in Baku in 2015

In the WTTC Houston, he lost to Fan Zhendong 0-4.

Lebesson lost to Fan Zhendong at WTTC Houston
Lebesson lost to Fan Zhendong at WTTC Houston


Emmanuel Lebesson equipment

Tibhar table tennis has confirmed Lebesson’s equipment. His material is:

Blade: Emmanuel Lebesson
Rubber (FH): Evolution FX-P
Rubber (BH): Evolution FX-P

Tibhar E Lebesson blade
Tibhar E Lebesson blade
Lebesson Tibhar racket
Lebesson Tibhar racket
Lebesson equipment
Lebesson equipment
Tibhar Lebesson blade
Tibhar Lebesson blade
Tibhar Lebesson blade handle
Tibhar Lebesson blade handle
Tibhar Lebesson blade 3
Tibhar Lebesson blade 3
Tibhar Lebesson blade 2
Tibhar Lebesson blade 2


Best mixed double in Europe

Emmanuel LEBESSON and YUAN Jia Nan in the semi-final of the Tokyo Olympic Mixed doubles Event. Emmanuel LEBESSON and YUAN Jia Nan are the best-mixed double in Europe.

France’s Emmanuel LEBESSON and YUAN Jia Nan at Tokyo Olympics
France’s Emmanuel LEBESSON and YUAN Jia Nan at Tokyo Olympics

Emmanuel LEBESSON and YUAN Jia Nan are one step away from an Olympic medal. In the quarterfinal, they beat WONG Chun Ting and DOO Hoi Kem of Hong Kong 4-3 (11-3, 6-11, 7-11, 11-8, 9-11, 11-7, 13-11). The seven-game thriller lasted over an hour, with both teams poised to advance to the semi-final after the first six games.

“It was an amazing game, and we got some lucky breaks. But we also fought hard for each point. It’s nice to have Jean-Philippe GATIEN, Sports Director of Paris 2024, in the stands and watching us today. It shows that table tennis is important, and we’ll now try to win at least a medal in the sport,” said LEBESSON.



He is one of the best left-hand player in Europe
He is one of the best left-hand player in Europe

WTT Contender Tunis: Lebesson and Yuan win mixed doubles. On Day Three of WTT Contender Tunis, top seeds Emmanuel Lebesson and Jia Nan Yuan of France won the Mixed Doubles event.

France’s Lebesson and Yuan claim mixed doubles title
France’s Lebesson and Yuan claim mixed doubles title


Biography

At the age of 5, he joined the Sport Athlétique Souché Niort club. Claude Bard, the club’s coach, discovered him. At 14, he joined Régis Canor’s Center of France in Bordeaux, and two years later, Michel Blondel’s INSEP. During this time, he stays with his old club.

Lebesson n2 player in France
Lebesson n2 player in France
Lebesson top European player
Lebesson top European player

Personal information

Full name Lebesson Emmanuel
Nickname Manu
Nationality France
Born 24 April 1988, Niort, France
Playing style Left-handed, shakehand grip
Highest ranking 20 (September 2017)
Club AS Pontoise-Cergy TT

Professional teams

He is playing in the Pro-A in France. One of the best players in Pro-A.

1994 -2007 – France SA Souché Niort TT
2007 – 2008 – France Saint-Denis US 93 TT
2008 – 2013 – France Levallois SC TT
2013 – 2016 – France Athletic Club de Boulogne-Billancourt
2016 – 2017- France Vaillante Angers
2017 – 2019- France SPO Rouen
2019 – 2020 – France AS Pontoise-Cergy TT
2020 – 2021 – Germany TTC Neu-Ulm
2021 – now -France AS Pontoise-Cergy TT

Player Stats – Performance

Total matches: 932
Total wins: 554 (59%)
Total loses: 378 (41%)


Emmanuel Lebesson’s special serve

Lebesson has a special serve. It’s difficult to read his serve. He is a left-hand player.

Sometimes he hides the serve with his head
Sometimes he hides the serve with his head
He has a very good and spinny serve
He has a very good and spinny serve


Career

Then in 2003, he won a bronze medal at the European Youth Championships in Novi Sad. In 2004, he began his international career in youth table tennis, winning the junior bronze medal at the WJC New Caledonia Open.

2021 Emmanuel Lebesson of France
2021 Emmanuel Lebesson of France

In 2005, he took bronze in junior doubles at the ITTF WJC Swedish Junior Open, and then again at the WJC Polish Youth Open. At the 2005 European Youth Championships in Prague, he won the French team title and the junior mixed doubles bronze medal.

Emmanuel Lebesson _ Facebook
Emmanuel Lebesson _ Facebook

In 2006, Lebesson competed in the World Youth Championship, reaching the quarter-finals in doubles. Lebesson won again at the European Youth Championships in Sarajevo, this time in mixed doubles.
2007 saw him reach the final of the Panasonic Open (China), the semi-final of the Swedish Open, and the winner of the Eurosib Russian Open and LIEBHERR French Open in the under-21 category, earning him a place in the group stage of the ITTF Grand Finals.

Emmanuel Lebesson at WTTC (by XIAOYU TANG)
Emmanuel Lebesson at WTTC (by XIAOYU TANG)

In 2007, Emmanuel competed in his first World Championship, in doubles with Adrien Mattenet, he was ranked 32nd. This combination also played in 2008 and 2009, winning the French Championship in 2008 and reaching the Pro Tour Grand Final semi-finals both years.

Emmanuel Lebesson celebrates
Emmanuel Lebesson celebrates

The US Saint-Denis 93 TT club played him in 2008 and 2009. In 2009 he joined SC Levallois Sporting Club Tennis de Table, where Patrick Chila also played. Lebesson won bronze in doubles with Damien Eloi at the 2009 Europeans. On May 23, 2009, at the age of 21, he won the French Championship in Dreux, beating Damien Eloi 4:0 after beating Patrick Chila in the semi-final. He won silver in the men’s team and doubles at Universiade-2009 in Belgrade. English Open-2009 reached the Pro Tour semi-finals in men’s doubles.

Emmanuel Lebesson vs Timo Boll (Czech Open 2017)
Emmanuel Lebesson vs Timo Boll (Czech Open 2017)

In 2010, he won bronze with Christophe Legoût and Adrien Mattenet at the European Championships in Ostrava. On his way to the final of the 2010 French Championships in Nîmes, he defeated Michel Martinez in the 1/2 finals and Adrien Mattenet in the 1/4 finals. From May 23 to 30, 2010, he competed in the World Team Championship in Moscow with Christophe Legoût, Abdel-Kader Salifou, Adrien Mattenet, and Simon Gauzy.

This year Lebesson entered the top 100 of the world rankings for the first time and has remained there since February 2011. In 2011, he won the French doubles championship with Adrien Mattenet but lost in the singles quarterfinals to Sébastien Jover. At the 2011 Universiade in Shenzhen, China, he won a bronze medal for France. Finalist in doubles at Pro Tour Slovenia Open-2011 and Pro Tour Morocco Open-2011.

Lebesson reached the World Tour singles semi-finals at the 2012 Brazilian Open. Lebesson climbed to 44th in the world, a new high. In 2013, he won the French doubles championship with Simon Gauzy. In 2013/14, he joined Boulogne-Billancourt. In September 2014, he was ranked 70th globally and 3rd in France. Qatar Open-2014 reached the World Tour final in men’s doubles.

In the 2015 European Games, France faced Germany in the semi-finals. Due to Timo Boll’s food poisoning, there were only two Germans, and they were always 0:2. At 2-2, Lebesson defeated Dimitrij Ovtcharov 3-1 in the final game, his second victory over a top 10 player of the day after defeating Vladimir Samsonov in the quarter-finals. Lebesson led the team with a 3-0 doubles and 2-0 singles record. At the European Championships later that year, they faced Germany again in the semi-finals, losing 3–1.

In 2016, France won their group with 5 wins in 5 games and faced an English team in the quarter-finals, which they beat 3-0. The quarter-final was lost 2-3, so the chance for a medal was lost. Since Lebesson’s first appearance in the World Team Championship in 2008, this position has steadily improved. In April 2016, he won the draw at the Halmstad qualification tournament in Sweden.

May 2016, he was ranked 36th in the world. Then he surpassed Adrien Mattenet to reclaim #2 in France. In his first singles match at the Olympics, he lost to Adrian Crişan. Like in the World Cup, France lost 2-3 to Great Britain (albeit in the round of 16 this time). In October 2016, he won the European Singles Championship, beating compatriot Simon Gauzy in the final.

He joined Vaillante Angers in the French Pro A league in 2016/17. In 2017, he won the French singles and doubles titles with Tristan Flore. He joined SPO Rouen in 2017/18. In 2017, he won bronze with France after a semi-final loss to Portugal. In September 2017, he reached his career-high ranking of 20. Then France had two top-20 players. He won bronze in doubles at the World Tour Qatar Open 2017 and singles at the World Tour Czech Open 2017.

He joined Pontoise-Cergy from SPO Rouen in 2018. In 2018, he played for France in the World Cup in England, where they lost to South Korea in the quarterfinals. With a wildcard, he was able to play in his first Men’s World Cup in Paris in 2018, reaching the main round before losing to Timo Boll. He reached the quarterfinals of the 2018 European Individual Championships in Alicante with Simon Gauzy.

2019 saw him win bronze with the team at the European Team Championship in Nantes, France. At the French National Championships, he won the men’s doubles and the mixed doubles with Tristan Flore. He won bronze in men’s doubles at the Hungarian Open-2019 and mixed doubles at the ITTF World Tour Platinum, Austrian Open-2019. As for the second European Games-2019, he made it to the quarterfinals in Minsk.

In 2019/2020, he joined AS Pontoise-Cergy TT, then TTC Neu-Ulm in the German Bundesliga, before returning to AS Pontoise-Cergy TT in 2021. He qualified for the 2020 Olympic Games as part of the French team at the ITTF World Team Qualification Event in Gondomar, winning all his individual and doubles games. He won the mixed doubles title with Jia Nan Yuan at the ITTF Challenge Plus Portugal Open-2020.

WTT Contenders Doha, the first tournament of the new WTT mixed doubles series, in 2021. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, he also won bronze in mixed doubles with Jia Nan Yuan at the 2020 European Table Tennis Championships in Warsaw. Then he reached the Tokyo Olympics mixed doubles semi-finals with Jia Nan Yuan and finished fourth. In singles, he won the European TOP-16 in Thessaloniki, Greece, in September. They reached the quarterfinals of the mixed doubles with Jia Nan Yuan in Houston in 2021.


EMMANUEL LEBESSON – Interview

team France at Europe Championship
team France at Europe Championship

Your favorite athlete during your childhood?

I was rocked by French sport. Someone like Jean Galfione inspired me in particular by his values ​​and his record as a champion. I may have also recognized myself in the fact of being an outsider like him, which also works for me.

Your best friend in sports?

I love horse racing and I have forged many ties with jockey Mathieu Mottier.

The thing that made you laugh the most during a competition?

During a match, one of my opponents had a more than pressing desire and he had to go during the match.

Your pre-match ritual?

Generally, I isolate myself by thinking of my loved ones by looking at a few photos.

Worst ritual you’ve seen from another athlete?

I knew a table tennis player who did 100 meters in the sprint to prepare which is perhaps not the most recommended thing. But everyone is free to prepare as they wish.

The true cliché about table tennis players?

That each player always starts a rally backward.

What the general public is far from imagining about table tennis?

I think they are far from imagining the physical dimension that exists in our sport. Many think directly of camping with this concrete table, which reminds them of the image of a beach sport.

If you could change something in your sport or discipline?

Let there be more media! Our sport is not televised enough, maybe we should make some changes like shortening the matches even if it is already short enough for the players. There may be something to do so that people understand the effects that we can put on because often the general public does not understand that we get balls out easily.

Your favorite technical move?

This is the pivot, that is to say, to turn around his backhand to hit a forehand.

Your most beautiful experience?

Obviously my title of European Champion in 2016. But I’m also thinking of my first victory in the French Championship in 2009 which paved the way for me for the rest of my career.

Your worst memory?

I have a lot (laughs). 4 hours after the birth of my son, we lost the 1/4 final of the World Championships against England after having had a match point.

What more do the Chinese have?

The number, because there are 100 million practitioners compared to 200,000 in France. I also think that the intensity and the number of hours spent training are more important, but with such a number of players, you do not see all the people who get injured. So it seems normal for them to release 5 or 6 exceptional players.

What does playing in France mean to you?

It’s great to be able to play 30 minutes from home in front of my family and loved ones. It multiplies the forces and I will need it given the complexity of my group during this World Cup.

I will try to get out of this chicken of death made up of Hugo Calderano (world No. 10) and Vladimir Samsonov (three-time World Cup winner). I think my current ranking (N°50) does not reflect my true level and I am not far from my opponents of the day.



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Table tennis coach in France since 2012, founder of pingsunday.com (the best online coaching program for table tennis players). Born in Vietnam in 1983, Ph.D. in Université Pierre Marie Curie. Read more about him.

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